Why rest days are so important for athletes

Sometimes taking a rest day is the toughest part of the week. It feels like everyone else is out training while you’re stuck at home twiddling your thumbs. It turns out that your recovery day is one of the most important days of the week and essential for health and optimal performance. So if you need some extra reasons to take your recovery day seriously, read on.  Sex hormone balance Recovery days can improve sex Read more…

blood test for female athletes

Ladies Leverage Your Physiology!

It’s not in your head Ladies, it’s not in your head- your physiology, training, and nutrition needs change throughout the month.  It’s time to leverage this information to work smarter, not harder, for better results. The science related to training around the menstrual cycle is emerging, yet very exciting. Ending underrepresentation  Since the passage of Title IX in 1972, the number of women participating in sports continues to skyrocket.  But up until relatively recently, women have Read more…

female athlete blood hormones

Q&A with Dr. A’nna Roby

Does estrogen play a role in recovery? Estrogen provides benefits during a workout that can help with recovery. For example, it prevents inflammation and limits free radical damage. This is helpful because less damage means quicker recovery from workouts. Furthermore, estrogen limits muscle damage itself, which reduces soreness. In terms of recovery itself, estrogen helps rebuild and remodel skeletal muscle.  Why do I feel warmer, hungrier, and sweat more at certain times of the month? Read more…

How frequently should athletes get a blood test?

How often should athletes check their blood markers? Here at Athlete Blood Test, we analyze many professional and elite athletes’ blood several times a year. Sometimes we even analyze their blood a few times during a season. But why? And should enthusiasts and recreational athletes do the same? As you’ll see below, the benefits of repeat testing extend to every athlete.  Let’s dive into the reasons why an athlete might want to do repeat blood Read more…

Which form of vitamin B12 should athletes take?

Vitamin B12 for athletes Vitamin B12 for athletes plays an important role in athletic performance. It’s a water-soluble vitamin that’s essential for red blood cell production, brain function and DNA synthesis. Low vitamin B12 can lead to anemia and cause a variety of symptoms, but most commonly athletes report feeling fatigued. Because athletes have a much higher physiological need for vitamin B12 and other micronutrients, symptoms can be felt well before a true deficiency occurs. Read more…

Folate for Athletes: many athletes are too low

Folate for athletes Folate is a water-soluble B vitamin (B9) that plays an important role in making DNA. It plays an important role in red blood cell production and tissue repair.  Folate is especially important for athletes, who have a high red blood cell turnover rate due to the stresses of training. Many athletes believe that their fatigue is due to an iron deficiency.  It could be, but folate deficiencies also can lead to anemia Read more…

Magnesium supplements for athletes

Magnesium from food sources Athlete commomly use magnesium supplements. It is the fourth most abundant mineral in the human body and is necessary for over 300 metabolic reactions, yet athletes often fall short on this electrolyte and crucial micronutrient.   Good food sources of magnesium include leafy greens (spinach, chard), legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, therefore, we always encourage athletes to source most of their magnesium from food. Magnesium as a supplements There are many Read more…

vitamin D for athletes

Vitamin D2 or D3 for athletes?

Technically, vitamin D is a hormone and found in a few foods, added to others, and made by the body when exposed to UV light. It’s easy not to get enough D and is one of the most common suboptimal nutrients in athletes. When looking for a vitamin D supplement, you’ll see a couple of options.